The rules of engagement

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Credit where it’s due

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Taylor Wimpey and the drug-crazed marsupials

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

The next 40 years starts now

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

When it rains, it pours

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Litigation: The long and short of it

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Obsolete office space is a growing problem

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

What makes an effective framework?

first_imgIt is important to remember that we are really still in the infancy of frameworks development and use. Frameworks were only included in the Public Contract Regulations in January 2006. Prior to this “suppliers lists” were commonplace until the EU questioned their transparency and ability to provide fair competition. The law provides limited guidance on how frameworks operate including the number of suppliers, call-off mechanism’s and a four year time limit. Within these broad parameters there is the potential to create a highly effective and valuable procurement tool, or to waste huge amounts of time to create a laborious and inefficient monster that doesn’t’ deliver for the client, contractor or the reputation of the sector.There are some great frameworks that serve their purpose to appoint good quality contractors and consultants to complete public sector projects. The effectiveness of these frameworks will have been established in the procurement strategy and embedded in the processes and procedures that govern them. Every framework will be different but there are a number of attributes that should be considered to ensure the effort of establishing a framework is worthwhile. These are identified below:·     Volume of work – There must be a healthy project pipeline and this should be identified and communicated to suppliers.·     Processes and procedures – There is a need to proactively manage a framework through documented procedures that both clients and suppliers will adhere to.·     Performance management – Mutually agreed KPI’s are utilised and league tables published to encourage peer competition.·     Dispute resolution – Structured mechanisms used with a hierarchy of escalation procedures.·     Fair payment – 30 day payment terms enforced for client and supply chain to end this persistent blight on our industry. Project bank accounts adopted possibly.·     Framework management – The resource effort to management the framework (for both client and suppliers) should be reflective of the project pipeline value.·     Innovation and knowledge share – Simple communication techniques can support continuous improvement for all parties benefit.·     Social value – Long-term relationships provide for the opportunity to contribute to the community through training and apprenticeships.·     Leadership – All of the above needs have clear leadership to achieve the desired outcomes.These aspects together with a framework design that has a degree of flexibility within the confines of Public Procurement Regulations will assist to achieve framework objectives.The skills required for framework management will become more in demand. A public sector client will have to see and achieve the benefits from investing in a framework agreement. For some clients the benefits may be just in the reduction of procurement costs, others may see the approach as an investment to improve their project delivery and increase value for money.The current status of construction framework agreements has developed over the past 10 years to varied degrees of success.  Because there is such a proliferation of frameworks in the market today it will take a long time to incorporate best practice into real practice, exasperated by the four year renewal cycle. Part three of this series looks at how framework may develop over the coming years.Charles McSweeney is a senior director at Sweett Grouplast_img read more

Heathrow’s third runway: No more standing still

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Leighton, Saipem win Gorgon deal

first_imgDesign will commence immediately and construction is scheduled to commence in October 2010 on Barrow Island, 70 kilometres off the Pilbara coast of Western Australia, and is expected to be completed in 2013.The scope of work consists of the design, material supply, fabrication, construction and commissioning of the LNG Jetty. The scope also includes supply, fabrication and construction of marine structures including a heavy lift facility, tug pens and navigation aids.Peter McMorrow, managing director of Leighton Contractors said: “The LNG Jetty and Marine structures are integral to the Gorgon LNG Project and the selection of the Saipem Leighton Consortium.”Ray Sputore, general manager Western Region, Construction Division of Leighton Contractors said the Saipem Leighton Consortium has proposed an innovative alternative structure design that would significantly enhance local workforce participation and reduce the environmental impact during the construction of the jetty.Mr Sputore said that concrete structures, known as caissons, would be manufactured at the Australian Marine Complex in Henderson, transported to Barrow Island and lowered onto gravel beds placed at intervals on the sea floor to provide a support structure for the jetty.”By using these locally manufactured caissons we will avoid the traditional piled construction method, which would have required hundreds of steel piles to be driven into the sea bed – this will reduce both the length of construction and eliminate the noise and vibration associated with driving piles into the sea bed.last_img read more