Traffic delays and water outages in South Donegal as major works planned

first_imgIrish Water has warned residents in Mountcharles, Inver, Dunkineely, N56 and surrounding areas in Co. Donegal to be prepared for water shortages on December 4 through to December 5 due to essential repair works. The works are also likely to cause traffic disruption and there will be a traffic management plan will be in place for the entire duration.In a statement, Irish Water said: ‘Works are scheduled to take place from 7am on December 4 until 4am on December 5. ‘We recommend that you allow 2-3 hours after the estimated restoration time for your supply to fully return.’Traffic delays and water outages in South Donegal as major works planned was last modified: December 3rd, 2018 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DunkineelyinverIrish WaterMOUNTCHARLESlast_img read more

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Perfect landing in blinding weather

first_imgA perfect landing in almost zero visibility weather is captured in this video.The pilots are using what is called a CAT 111b landing system that guides them – and the aircraft – with pinpoint accuracy onto the runway.WATCH: How tough is the Airbus A380? See the amazing video!Perfect landing! ✨✈️ pic.twitter.com/phr1zayQFz— Airplane Pictures ✈ (@ilove_aviation) August 13, 2019Autoland systems were developed to enable aircraft to land virtually blind although they can be used in all levels of visibility.However, there are limits to the amount of wind component that an autoland system can handle.For instance, for a 747-400 the maximum headwind is 25 kts (28mph / 46km/hr), maximum tailwind 10 kts and a maximum crosswind of 25 kts.However for the autoland to work an airport must be equipped with an appropriate Instrument Landing System (ILS) or Microwave Landing System (MLS).There are various levels of ILS capability.CAT 1 has a decision height for the pilot of 200ft (61m) and the pilot must be able to see 2400ft (55m) down the runway. For CAT 11 the decision height is 100ft (30m) and a runway visual range of 1000ft (300m). CAT111a 100ft and 660ft, CAT111b 50ft and 246ft.Most airports have only a CAT 1 capability.The first aircraft to be certified to CAT III standards was a Sud Aviation Caravelle in December 1968 followed by the Hawker-Siddeley Trident in May 1972 to CAT IIIa. It achieved CAT IIIb in 1975.The Trident had been certified to CAT II in February 1968.last_img read more

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Today’s Top LP Jobs

first_imgDistrict Loss Prevention Manager, Kohl’s, (MI) The DLPM develops and implements the Loss Prevention program for 6 -15 selling locations. The DLPM is responsible for driving results through achievement of goals related to inventory shortage, budget lines, cash variance, and operational compliance. In addition, the DLPM is responsible for the selection and career development of all exempt and non-exempt loss prevention personnel within the assigned locations… Learn moreDirector of Client Services and Digital Projects, LPM Media Group, (NC) LPM Media Group is looking for an organized and creative individual to support our growing business by providing custom publishing services to our clients through the delivery of print, digital, and mobile solutions for employee training, awareness, and communication campaigns. While we provide services to a variety of organizations, our roots are in retail and we specialize in the delivery of solutions that support loss prevention, asset protection, and profit protection strategies… Learn more[text_ad use_post=’2385′]- Sponsor – Loss Prevention & Safety Manager, Lowe’s, (KY) This position implements loss prevention and safety programs, overseeing and coordinating processes to minimize loss while maintaining a safe working and shopping environment. In addition, this position will train and provide mentorship around safety and loss prevention for teams of individual contributors in multiple store locations… Learn moreLoss Prevention / Safety Investigator, Navy Exchange, (FL) The Navy Exchange Service Command is a $2.4 billion retail company operating stores on Naval bases worldwide. Our mission is to provide our customers (the Navy Family) with quality goods and services at a savings and to support Quality of Life programs. We have 109 Navy Exchange stores, over 1,200 service outlets (barber/beauty shops, autoports, mini-marts, gas stations, etc), 40 Navy Lodges… Learn more Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Architecture trade-offs for enterprise analytics

first_imgIntel Corporation explores the questions decision-makers need to ask when thinking about an architecture for enterprise analytics. Given the wealth of technology options now available, deciding which analytics ‘stack’ to adopt involves a series of architectural trade-offs. In our experience of building analytics systems and working with customers to help deliver on their ambitions, we have learned the most important questions are around where to store and process data, what kinds of databases to use and how to make sure the right people have access.On the first question, we are all faced with the reality that data can come from literally anywhere. As we outline in our guide, Five Steps to Delivering the Data-Driven Business, a first step is to understand these information flows. Once this is done, infrastructure teams must decide whether to take and process feeds of data from the source, or whether to pull data into a managed repository such as a data lake, from where it can be processed.Each option has plusses and minuses. Taking data direct from the source minimizes the need for storage infrastructure, but increases the load on the network. Meanwhile, data lakes can result in storing information that will never be needed, potentially slowing down analysis and using up valuable storage capacity.For larger enterprises, the solution often consists of multiple repositories, each designed to meet the need of certain types, and sources, of data. For example, a public cloud repository may be the most appropriate option for collating large volumes of external data before it is accessed for analytics; some data may be more straightforward to access directly from the source, whereas others (particularly transactional data) can be harvested into a central store, accessible on the internal network; and so on.Having decided where the data should live, attention can turn to how it should be managed. The choice of database stack has implications, not just in terms of the type, quantity and formatting of data being stored but also how it will be used. For example:In-memory analytics such as SAP HANA* or SAS solutions can reduce query times from hours to minutes, for data that needs to be analyzed quicklyOpen source tools such as Hadoop* or NoSQL* approaches enable fast analysis of trends and hypothesis testingCloud-based streaming and data management architectures, including no-ops models such as AWS Lambda*, enable data-driven workflows, preprocessing and cleaning to be completed quicklyDeciding on the tool for the job requires balancing business criteria such as specificity, timeliness, value and accuracy of results against data-related criteria such as volumes, velocity and variability. Cost is also an inevitable factor, meaning that traditional database management tools and hardware will always have a place.While the result is about being best of breed, it is important to standardize on a set of technologies that will meet most your needs: the alternative (free-for-all) scenario leads to management overhead as well as risk due to increased complexity and skills requirements.The third question is about ensuring data is directly accessible by those who need it, while being inaccessible to others. This is where data architecture and information security architecture meet, invoking questions such as whether and how to secure the perimeter, how to manage identities and roles, what data to encrypt, how to enable mobile data access and so on.Some answers to these questions will depend on understanding the importance of the data to your organization. Some insights may be confidential, as they give an organization competitive advantage; whereas other data can be treated as ‘open’ and accessible to third parties and/or the public at large.Ultimately, deciding on the right analytics architecture requires a series of trade-offs in terms of where data should exist, how it should be stored and processed, and how it is secured. As each trade-off can have an impact on the business value the data can bring, it is important to involve business decision makers in these trade-offs.However technical an analytics architecture decision may appear, it should always be tied back to delivering on a business goal. In this way, the architecture can be a source of increasing value, as the organization becomes attuned to how it can benefit from more advanced forms of analytics, such as deep learning, to drive its business goals forward.Learn more about how advanced analytics can help you transform your business, and what you can do to make it happen, by reading the Five Steps To Delivering The Data-Driven Business white paper from Intel.Find more information on data-driven insights and advanced analytics by visiting our Turn Data Into Insight website, where you can find it all in one convenient location.last_img read more

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10 months agoCardiff boss Neil Warnock furious with ‘ridiculous’ loan limitations

first_imgTagsSerie A NewsLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Cardiff boss Neil Warnock furious with ‘ridiculous’ loan limitationsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCardiff City boss Neil Warnock has launched a furious attack on the Premier League’s loan rules.Top-flight sides are not allowed to have more than two players on loan from Premier League or EFL clubs.And Warnock raged: It’s just such a ridiculous rule. “I agree that you can’t have more than one from a club but what’s to stop having three loan players in the squad and giving them the opportunity to play the Premier League.“In clubs like ourselves which haven’t got a lot of money, it’s an opportunity to give them.” last_img read more

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IAF gets 1st Apache Guardian attack copter

first_imgNew Delhi: US aerospace major Boeing has handed over first of the 22 Apache Guardian attack helicopters to the Indian Air Force, nearly three-and-half years after a multi-billion dollar deal for the choppers was sealed.Senior IAF officials said the addition of AH-64E (I) Apache helicopter is a significant step towards modernisation of the force’s chopper fleet. The helicopter has been customised to suit IAF’s future requirements and would have significant capability in mountainous terrain, they said. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh”The first AH-64E (I) – Apache Guardian helicopter was formally handed over to the Indian Air Force at Boeing production facility in Mesa, Arizona, the US on May 10,” IAF Spokesperson Group Captain Anupam Banerjee said. The AH-64E Apache is a leading multi-role attack helicopter and is flown by the US Army. The IAF had signed a multi-billion dollar contract with the US government and Boeing Ltd in September 2015 for 22 Apache helicopters. The first batch of these helicopters is scheduled to be shipped to India by July this year. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroad”Selected aircrew and ground crew have undergone training at the training facilities at US Army base Fort Rucker, Alabama. These personnel will lead the operationalisation of the Apache fleet in the IAF,” the IAF said in a statement. It said the helicopter has been customised to suit the IAF’s future requirements and would have significant capability in mountainous terrain. “The helicopter has the capability to carry out precision attacks at standoff ranges and operate in hostile airspace with threats from ground,” the IAF said. It said the ability of these helicopters, to transmit and receive the battlefield picture, to and from the weapon systems through data networking makes it a lethal acquisition. “These attack helicopters will provide significant edge in any future joint operations in support of land forces,” the IAF added. Additionally, the Defence Ministry in 2017 approved the procurement of six Apache helicopters along with weapons systems from Boeing at a cost of Rs 4,168 crore for the Army. This will be its first fleet of attack choppers. Fuselages for this Army order will be produced by Tata Boeing Aerospace Limited, a joint venture between Boeing and Tata Advanced Systems in Hyderabad.last_img read more

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The Home Run Derby Myth

On Monday night, some of baseball’s best sluggers will compete in the Home Run Derby. One of them is likely to have a more disappointing second half of the season, and someone is then likely to blame the derby.Case in point: At the MLB All-Star break in 2013, Chris Davis of the Baltimore Orioles had a stat line fit for a king. He had slugged 37 home runs, driven in 93 runs and had an enviable 1.109 OPS. Naturally, Davis was selected for the Home Run Derby, placing fourth. After the Derby, Davis’s season took a turn for the worse; he hit 16 home runs and battled with an injury on his hand — a blister he popped during the derby.The decline in Davis’s power numbers fueled the belief that participating in the Home Run Derby alters a player’s swing in the second half of the season. We heard a similar story when Josh Hamilton’s HR production fell after the 2008 derby. And Bobby Abreu famously blamed the derby when he had fell back to Earth in the second half of the 2005 season.But here’s the more likely culprit in these post-derby declines: regression to the mean. Data from the 2009 to 2013 seasons shows that although derby participants’ second-half stats do, on average, fall off, participants actually outperform the other top home-run hitters from the first half of the season.Consider the difference between the first and second halves of Davis’s 2013 season. In the first half, Davis was hitting a home run every 9.7 at-bats, tops in the MLB among hitters who qualified for the batting title in both halves of the season. In the second half, Davis hit a home run every 12.9 at-bats, still No. 1 among qualified hitters. This rise of 3.2 AB/HR seems large, but the top home-run hitters from the first half experienced an overall rise of 4.8 AB/HR from the first half to the second half. Additionally, Davis’s walk percentage rose from 9.9 percent to 11.7 percent in the second half, which is an indication he saw fewer good pitches to hit and thus had fewer opportunities to hit home runs.Another stat that relates to home runs supports the regression theory. Per the advanced baseball data site FanGraphs.com, Davis had a home-run-per-fly-ball ratio (HR/FB) of 35.6 percent in the first half of 2013, whereas that number was 21.3 percent in the second half. Davis has a career HR/FB rate of 22.3 percent. In his career, he has an average drop of 6.3 percentage points in his HR/FB numbers from the first half to the second half. The rate has dropped in three of the four seasons he has played at least 80 games.Davis isn’t alone in seeming to suffer after the Home Run Derby, when, in fact, that difference in statistics can be explained otherwise.For this study, we compared the first and second halves of players who qualified for the batting title in both halves and finished tied for 50th or better in total home runs in the first half. Home Run Derby participants were compared to these players in at-bats per home run, walk percentage, strikeout percentage and one other key statistic: hard-hit average.Hard-hit average is developed by measuring the number of hard-hit balls a player records per at-bat. Hard-hit balls are a subjective measure of contact quality gathered by Inside Edge scouting services — one of the baseball industry’s primary data providers.At-bats per home run are used rather than slugging percentage, isolated power or raw home runs, because we don’t want to punish hitters for doing other things. For example, if home runs per plate appearance were used, we would be punishing a hitter for taking walks. If we used slugging percentage, we may be hurting hitters who don’t gather many hits other than home runs. The goal is to measure home-run production, which can be done by looking at how often a player hits home runs in the opportunities he is given to hit them (at-bats).These numbers help show that the Home Run Derby has little to no impact on a players’ power numbers. Home Run Derby participants hit the ball hard with more frequency in the second half of the season while maintaining similar AB/HR ratios. Over the past five years, derby participants who qualified in both halves of the season had a hard-hit average of .253 in the second half, which is 11 points greater than that of the other power hitters in the majors. Additionally, they strike out less often and walk more frequently than non-derby participants in the second half.Second-Half Performance Among Top Power HittersAnother aspect to consider is the type of player who is picked for the derby. Consider 2009 participant Brandon Inge: He hit 21 home runs in the first half of the 2009 season for a home run every 14.2 at-bats. Inge’s first-half numbers warranted consideration for the derby. However, Inge’s career AB/HR is 33.0, which suggests he was a primary candidate to regress to the mean in the second half. After the derby, Inge managed a home run every 43.8 at-bats, second worst among the top 50 power hitters from the first half who qualified for the batting title in both halves.We can also consider that the average Home Run Derby participant over the past five years has had a first-half AB/HR rate of 15.6, the same as the first-half AB/HR rate of Miguel Cabrera over that span. We should not expect Home Run Derby participants to produce home runs at the same rate as Cabrera over an extended period.None of this means that the Home Run Derby has zero impact on a player’s second-half results. It does appear likely, however, that the decline in results — among participants and the majors’ other top-50 home-run hitters — is due to expected regression. The players selected for the Derby are typically among the best home-run producers of the first half, though they may not necessarily be among the best power hitters in baseball. Uncharacteristic performances help players get selected for the Home Run Derby, and the decline in their numbers in the second half is more likely to be due to natural regression than their participation in the event. read more

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Lawyer who emailed Tressel identified

Columbus attorney Christopher T. Cicero, a former OSU walk-on linebacker, was the man who informed Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel that members of his team were committing NCAA rules violations, according to The Columbus Dispatch. Cicero, 54, was a member of the Buckeyes in 1983, the first year in which Tressel was an assistant at OSU under coach Earle Bruce. OSU performed an internal investigation that uncovered that Cicero e-mailed Tressel in April 2010 to inform him that multiple OSU football players were selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits from Eddie Rife, the owner of a Columbus tattoo shop who was under a federal investigation for drug trafficking charges. Cicero and Tressel exchanged eight e-mails between April 2, 2010, and June 6, 2010, regarding the matter. OSU released the e-mails between Cicero and Tressel on Tuesday with Cicero’s name and other content redacted. OSU’s internal investigation found that Tressel had failed to properly report the potential violations to the university and recommended on Tuesday that he be suspended for the first two games of the 2011 season and be fined $250,000. In December, six OSU players — Terrelle Pryor, Dan Herron, Mike Adams, DeVier Posey, Solomon Thomas and Jordan Whiting — were suspended for the start of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. In Cicero’s e-mails, he expressed concern about the players selling their keepsakes. “These kids are selling these items for not that much and I cant (sic) understand how they could give something so precious away like their trophy’s and rings that they worked so hard for,” Cicero said in an e-mail to Tressel on April 16. In that e-mail, Cicero went on to explain how his father worked two jobs to provide for his family before dying in 2001 at the age of 67. His father, Carmello Cicero, of Lyndhurst, Ohio, worked as a police officer, steel mill worker and volunteer firefighter at various points in his life. In a press conference to announce the violations, Tressel said he did not report the potential violations because Cicero had requested in his second e-mail that the information be kept confidential. “I needed to keep sight of the fact that confidentiality was requested by the attorney,” Tressel said. “I’ve learned that I probably needed to go to the top legal council person at the university.” Cicero could not be reached for comment. OSU director of media relations Jim Lynch did not immediately return comment. read more

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Baseball team makes 4 errors blows 4run lead in 2nd straight loss

The Ohio State baseball team blew a four-run lead in the ninth inning as Iowa shocked the Buckeyes with a 9-8 victory in 10 innings Saturday afternoon. Fans in Bill Davis Stadium sat in silence, stunned as they watched the Buckeyes fall apart in the final two innings of the ballgame. “We were in a really good situation with a four-run lead,” coach Greg Beals said. “We were behind, rallied and fought to extend the lead there, but we just couldn’t close the door.” OSU (22-24, 10-10) was trying to rebound from its 7-0 loss Friday night when it could not generate any offense against the Hawkeyes (20-27, 9-11). While it took five innings for OSU to record its first hit in the first game, it took just two batters Saturday. Freshman outfielder Tim Wetzel singled and later scored to give the Buckeyes a 1-0 lead. Iowa tied the game in the second and took the lead in the fourth, thanks to a two-out rally. The Hawkeyes had a walk and three straight hits as they scored three times to take a 4-1 lead. The Buckeyes tallied two more runs in the fourth and fifth to cut the lead to 4-3 entering the seventh. After junior second baseman Ryan Cypret’s single tied the game at 4-4, a walk and an error put runners at the corners. Sophomore catcher Greg Solomon then crushed a 1-2 pitch deep to left for a three-run home run, giving the Buckeyes a 7-4 lead. OSU added an insurance run in the eighth inning, taking an 8-4 lead into the ninth. After the Buckeyes handed the ball to freshman closer Josh Dezse, the game seemed to be in hand. It wasn’t. Iowa rallied to tie the game with four runs, taking advantage of Dezse’s off day and a Wetzel throwing error. With only one out and runners on second and third, senior reliever Theron Minium recorded the final two outs to escape the jam. After OSU failed to score in the ninth, the game went into extra innings. Iowa led off the inning with a single and bunted the runner over to second. A base hit coupled with a fielding error by junior outfielder David Corna allowed the Hawkeyes to score the tiebreaking run. It was all they needed, as the Buckeyes went down in order in the 10th. OSU looks to salvage the final game in the series at 1:05 p.m. Sunday at Bill Davis Stadium. Dezse drops the ball Dezse, who had been very reliable in recent weeks, was off his game Saturday. He was having trouble with his command, and some of his pitches didn’t have the normal zip to them. “For the last three weeks, he’s been lights out for us,” Beals said. “Today was just one of those days he didn’t have his stuff and the command on his pitches.” Errors, errors, errors OSU had four errors against the Hawkeyes. There were two crucial ones in the final innings, which possibly could have altered the outcome dramatically had they been avoided. “We didn’t play a very clean baseball game,” Beals said, “and obviously the four errors weren’t good.” read more

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Renard proud of Morocco team

first_imgHervé Renard was proud of his Morocco side after they once more demonstrated their ability to play football the right way after a narrow 1-0 defeat to Portugal made them the first team to be eliminated from the World CupThe Atlas Lions did not go out without a fight and they created enough chances to earn at least a draw at the Luzhniki Stadium on Wednesday with new Wolves goalkeeper Rui Patricio having to produce a superb one-handed save to deny Younes Belhanda’s header.An early Cristiano Ronaldo header in the fourth minute of the game was enough to secure Portugal the win with Morocco having now lost their opening two group games in their past three World Cup appearances (1970, 1994 & 2018).However, Renard was left discontent with the referee for having failed to award them a penalty after Portugal defender Pepe made contact with the ball with his hand in the penalty area in the 85th minute of the game.Cristiano Ronaldo, PortugalAli Daei wouldn’t be upset if Ronaldo breaks his scoring record Andrew Smyth – September 13, 2019 Iranian legend Ali Daei wouldn’t be upset to lose his record as international football’s all-time record scorer to the “great” Cristiano Ronaldo.“You have to look at number 3 (Pepe) in slow motion, I think everything is said,” said the Frenchman, according to Morocco World News.Nevertheless, the 49-year-old was clearly proud of his team.“We are a team that plays football, we demonstrated it again,” said an emotional Renard.Moroccan striker Nordin Amrabat was named man-of-the-match for his display with Morocco set to play their final World Cup game against Spain on June 25.last_img read more

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