London Olympics qualification within grasp says coach Michael Nobbs

first_imgThe Indians need to be wary of themselves as none of the other contenders have it in them to beat the hosts if they play to potential in the Olympic men’s hockey qualifier in February, head coach Michael Nobbs said on Monday.India will be up against France, Italy, Poland, the United States and Canada with only the winners of the February 18-26 tournament making it to London.”Our destiny is in our hands. If we play like we can, we will qualify,” Nobbs said. “I’m not concerned about the other teams. The only team we should be wary of is ourselves.”As things stand, I am 90-95 per cent certain that we will qualify. We just have to guard against setbacks like injuries, cards, poor umpiring or lack of concentration. It will come down to one or two matches.”The preparatory camp for the qualifier has shifted from Bangalore to the Capital with 45 players in attendance, and though Nobbs felt the number was too large, the Australian admitted that it served a purpose.”We want to have four players for each position so that we don’t suffer due to injuries or suspensions.”After the qualifier, we will have two different teams going for the Sultan Azlan Shah Cup in Malaysia and a European tour, apart from a junior side going abroad. That’s how we plan to create a strong bench,” he told Mail Today during a training session at the Major Dhyan Chand National Stadium.”If we qualify for the Olympics, we will not field our strongest side till London. The players who will be left out will no doubt be disappointed, but there is no way the same players can take the field throughout the year.”advertisementIndia’s attacking play and penalty corner prowess has lately been an envy of other teams, but Nobbs believes there is still work to be done on the defence and concentration.”In Sandeep Singh, VR Raghunath and Rupinder Pal Singh, we have three of the best drag-flickers in the world. But we cannot afford to have both Sandeep and Raghu on the pitch at the same time. They are both equally good on penalty corners and have almost a 90 per cent success rate. The defenders cannot block them even if they know who is taking the strike,” the coach said.Raghunath’s composure at vital moments still gives Nobbs a headache. It was the yellow card shown to the Karnataka defender when India were 3-1 ahead in the Champions Challenge I that proved costly.”I have told Raghu that his new year resolution should be ‘no cards’,” the coach joked.As far as the defence is concerned, Nobbs said it was not a problem unique to India.”Most top sides at the recent Champions Trophy played attacking hockey, which meant they were often stretched at the back. We scored 29 goals in the Champions Challenge and if we continue to score more than the opposition, we will be fine. The attacking style suits us as Indians are naturally talented and that’s what makes us feared in the game.”India take on South Africa in a five-match series starting this weekend and it will serve as a selection trial for the Olympic qualifier. Nobbs, who took over this summer, is happy with the progress the team has made on fitness – “we were the fittest team in South Africa (at the Champions Challenge I) but believes work needs to be done on the physical side of the game.”We are regularly barged off the ball by stronger European, Australian and New Zealand players. We still have to get stronger and build muscle mass.”Asked about the criticism he faced from some quarters because he wanted the players to attend the national camp instead of playing in World Series Hockey, Nobbs said, “I am employed by the people of India. The Sports Authority of India is putting so much money on the team. It made no sense that the players would go somewhere for six to eight weeks and return to attend the camp two weeks before the qualifier.””There has to be a structure to the coaching camps.”last_img read more

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ICC Champions Trophy: World’s best cricketers revel how the edge is earned to win

first_imgClick here to EnlargeBetween them, they have it all. Skill, strength, muscle, memory, instinct and intelligence. But owning everything guarantees nothing. Bringing it all does-all together at just the right time, in just the right amounts and for just long enough to force the adversary to buckle.The world’s leading cricket,Click here to EnlargeBetween them, they have it all. Skill, strength, muscle, memory, instinct and intelligence. But owning everything guarantees nothing. Bringing it all does-all together at just the right time, in just the right amounts and for just long enough to force the adversary to buckle.The world’s leading cricket teams, now in India for the Champions Trophy, play a game considered the light entertainment of their sport, where games race by and performances blur. On the outside, one-day cricket is all action, its execution swift, its vocabulary brutal: “slog overs”, “death bowling”, “power play”, “pinch hitter”.On the inside, it is a maze of variables to be grasped and problems solved-in the time it takes to reach from the sofa to pick and hurl an empty can of beer at your team’s prize moron who just tried to clear longon.On the outside, we see heaves over long-on, scrambled singles, aerobatic catching. In the middle, the mental contest of calculation, aggression and entrapment across every skill of the game is as constant and even more fierce. It takes more to win a one-day international than 100 overs of adrenaline. Cricket’s best competitors explain.BATTING They are the hit-and-run men that keep the ODI engine room going. Modern day batsmen are both hunters of high strike rates and processors of information.OPENING UP “When we chased 434, we had five-over targets and one big swing every over.”MARK BOUCHER Tendulkar and Dravid: The hunter and the gathererThe openers in the short game are both axemen and information collectors. They go out there with the intention of sizing up the conditions for the rest and taking apart the bowlers for themselves. The trend now is to get a sighter for a couple of overs and then for the aggressive partner to begin to fire. During the early stages of the match, the message from the middle is sent back to the dressing room about what sort of total is reasonable when setting a target or an idea of how an innings can be paced when chasing.If the ball is doing a bit at the start, batsmen like Sachin Tendulkar calculate the situation 10-15 overs down the line before planning their assault. Chasing 320 may not, explains Tendulkar, mean keeping up with a six-plus run rate from the get-go but understanding that if the team has wickets in hand, more could be possible later. “Sometimes you work out that it’s easier to score eight in the middle rather than six-plus at the start,” he says. (Even as commentators and the general public are no doubt bemoaning the sluggish run-rate).advertisementLess aggressive openers like Australian Simon Katich work hard at turning the strike over and believe they can show “intent and aggression” even if not smashing the ball. “You try to defend into a gap, steal a single to get your partner into play.” The advent of the Power Plays has seen teams use the extra five overs of field restrictions to set and chase taller targets but also giving the openers a few more tempters. When the bowling team keeps its frontliners on for a longer spell to ride out the Power Plays, the cat and mouse continues: batsmen waiting to have a go at the part-timers, bowlers trying to lure the openers into attacking them.The key to being a good one-day opener, according to England’s Andrew Strauss, “is the ability to play in a lot of different ways, to play the situation”. To go after the bowling on flat wickets or if the white ball is swinging (which it can often do), to be good enough to back their technique to see the turbulence through. Just like in Tests, openers look for partnerships but at healthy strike rates to create a platform for those that follow. More than any other quality, ODI openers exemplify the dramatic improvement in the modern batsman’s hitting power and his ability to put the ball over the ropes.ORDER IN THE MIDDLE Boucher: Chaser extraordinaireIf 1996 was about the first 15 overs, the 2003 World Cup was about big finishes, and the 2007 World Cup, some say, will be decided by the middle overs. This year Australia failed to defend totals of 331 and 434, the middle order opposition anchoring spectacular chases. Indian captain Rahul Dravid believes the men in blue chase best when they have wickets in hand. Pakistan’s Younis Khan prefers to stay ahead of the run rate, leaving the later batsmen to mop up rather than hit out.Batsmen walking in with a long chase ahead need “role clarity”, says Kiwi Brendon McCullum. Is he the ag-gressor or merely support to a settled batsman? “Chasers”, who Dravid says must think on their feet, find their game plans by answering a check-list of questions: will the wicket last? Or will it spin and be tough to score later? Should you accumulate quickly now? Or are the batsmen to follow in form so there are a few overs to play with? Where are the gaps in the field? England all-rounder Paul Collingwood says, “In oneday cricket, most of the time you have more time than you actually think.”advertisementTHE HITS TO HOME Pietersen: Finding the hitting zonesEight an over to get and the opposition is sniffing blood. In walks England’s Kevin Pietersen. “The idea is not to try to manufacture shots even when under pressure. To take your time, to know your targets and to hit your imareas.” Mark Boucher, involved in a world record chase of 434, says on that day the South Africans set a target to reach every five overs and decided to take one mandatory big swing every over. All teams now have a big hitter whose job is to clear the field, like Pietersen, Dhoni for India, or Justin Kemp for South Africa.At practice, South African batsmen receive throw-downs on the pitch from where they try to clear the ropes-to gain confidence that they can do it during a game. Mike Hussey, Australia’s calmest finisher today, says the key to keeping cool when the heat is on is an assessment of the conditions and communication with his partner. “You see the pitch, is it turning, bouncing… Then you decide when to go: sometimes it could be earlier to target a bowler, or later to see someone off.”BOWLING They say it’s a batsman’s game, but don’t tell the men who try to stay one step ahead of cricket’s glamour boys, no matter how high the odds are.FIRST STRIKESLeeFor the first time ever, Brett Lee, Shoaib Akhtar and Shane Bond, each of them runaway trains on two legs if the mood takes over, will be playing in one tournament in India. With them fit and functioning, their teams know that they bring to the somewhat predictable formula of one-day batting the lingering possibility of wanton destruction. “People say it’s a batsman’s game,” drawls Akhtar, dopily dismissive of the idea, “but they’re wrong. Bowlers win games, mate.”At their best, Lee, Akhtar and Bond prove that ODIs need not necessarily be run-fests. Their short 10-over bursts, like those of seasoned practitioners such as Glenn McGrath and Shaun Pollock, are short snatches of drama in the mini-series that is a one-day game. A strike bowler’s opening spell is a statement of intent. Lee’s goal before every first burst is a wicket in his opening spell. “Those goals can change after the first or the second ball,” he admits. As the leading wicket-taker in ODIs this year, Lee has sharpened Australia’s edge a little. Variation and change of pace are important to all bowlers but in an ODI, Lee’s task list is pared down: get the ball through to the keeper, dot the batsman up, stay patient. Bond, whose career-and therefore his imareas.” pact on New Zealand’s results- has always been dogged by injury, looks for a different kind of impact first up. “Line and length at pace is what I want to do in my first spell-and I hope it swings because that gives me something more.”advertisementA bowler’s understanding of his own skills and limitations, as the master of minimalism Glenn McGrath summarises, is what makes bowlers a threat to batsmen. Mere pace is little without accuracy and even the effervescent Makhaya Ntini knows this. Pace is used as a base to keep the lines tight and the landing areas difficult.Even showboats like Akhtar bow to the demands of variation and keep a batsman guessing. Bond has arrived at his own needfor-speed formula: “I try to be smarter with my pace. Try to pick when to bowl quick. I’m not looking to last as long as I can but to be the best I can.” If a team is defending a big total, opening bowlers will keep it conservative. Set a low target and watch the strike force pull out their tricks to get the breakthrough. “All you want is for a batsman to go after you,” says Bond.SLOW SQUEEZE Harbhajan: Entrapment, one ball at a timeIf bowlers are regarded as the cannon fodder of the one-day game, then with boundaries getting smaller, the spinners should be heading for extinction sometime soon. Except as an entire club of slow bowlers will be quick to point out, the world’s second highest one-day wicket taker is Sri Lankan Mutthiah Muralitharan. And that spinners and pace bowlers have similar averages and strike rates in the one-day game.There is a whole kitchen-garden variety of slow bowling on offer in the one-day game: the purists, the pushers, the part-timers and the double-duty men (who switch between spin and seam). The ODI spinner is considered to have turned into a force mostly in the sub-continent on tracks that start to slow down and bite during the course of a 100 overs. But most teams play one quality spinner for the variety of option he offers and his ability to break the tempo of run scoring when batsmen begin to tee off a succession of medium pacers.Most consistent ODI success comes unfailingly to the spinner who believes in attack: not merely with his bowling, but also with his mindset and his body language. Like Harbhajan ‘Turbanator’ Singh whose line in one-dayers comes a few inches closer to the stumps from where he attacks in Tests. He says one of his key tasks is to identify and cut off a frontline batsman’s “pressurereleasing shot”. Australia’s Brad Hogg refuses to entertain the idea that spinners are mere “entertainment” for batsmen. “We may take fewer risks in trying to get wickets in ODIs, but you’re bringing all your variety into trying to get wickets.”IN THE DEATH ZONE “Bowling at the death is about keeping it simple, building pressure and staying calm.” GLENN MCGRATH Six balls left, 10 runs to get, Mahendra Singh Dhoni at one end and a tailender at another. What would Shaun Pollock do? Red-haired Pollock will only smile. “Make sure they don’t get 10 runs.” All the great men gently inform wisdom-seekers that there is both depth and truth in simplicity and so it is with bowling in the death. At the end of every net, after Pollock & Co. have finished practising with the new ball, the South Africans have their bowlers send down 12-15 balls with an old ball to simulate death bowling. To simulate dewy conditions they expect to find in the Champions Trophy, the wet ball is also part of this drill. The key at the end, every bowler will say, is to stick to one’s core strength. That could be slipping in the slower ball, like Dwayne Bravo did to Yuvraj Singh in the West Indies.Or as Ntini of South Africa says, “to look to come fast-as a fast bowler it is not my duty to bowl the slower ball”. To McGrath, sustaining the pressure of his accuracy is usually a good enough plan. “If they need 9-10 an over, I try to keep it tight. Cricket is a simple sport we complicate and that’s what makes it difficult.” South African Andrew Hall likes to work out his options ball by ball, to anticipate the batsman’s shot depending on the vacant areas in the field. Apart from the slower ball, reverse swing is used, particularly in the sub-continent. The idea is to always get a new batsman facing strike or walking in.FIELDINGCricket’s ‘unselfish’ third skill combines athleticism, anticipation and a lot of attention to detail.Collinwood: Finest”Before anything else, good fielding means working out exactly where to stand.”MOHAMMED KAIF Like specialists with the bat and ball, the best fielders in the world must be both thinkers and doers. The men who field in the 30-yard circle are all highly prized specialists. Mohammed Kaif, India’s man at the cover, says, “Before everything else, a fielder has to work out the right spot in which to stand. That comes from your game sense, your situational sense. Is the batsman playing square or straight? What are his strong shots? What lines are being bowled to him?” The ring fielders need to be in a position where they give themselves the best chance to cut off the angles of the batsman’s strokes. “Only after that do you use your physical skill and ability to cut off the runs,” says Kaif.The moment he gets to an ODI venue, England’s Paul Collingwood checks out the view from backward point. During practice, he works not just on his catching but also picking up the ball cleanly at the half-volley. Good fielders, he says, need “good hands”. During ODIS, all fielders have made adjustments to the varying bounce on the ground and the suitability of the grass for diving or sliding. Towards the end of an ODI, they must all be able to sight a dirty white ball in less than ideal light against advertising boards or the dark background of the crowd-and then take a catch or stop a run. Square of the wicket is widely regarded as the toughest place to field on because the ball goes down the pitch and then moves sideways, making it harder to anticipate. The Australian close-in cordon, say Andrew Symonds, works like a ‘defensive unit’ with a “tight circle that becomes hard to pierce”.CAPTAINCYTo captains more than most, this is instant cricket. How the toughest men in the business cope with the high-speed, high-energy form of the game.Fleming: Staying fresh and getting helpTough guys do crack and it’s usually the one-day game that gets to them. The average playing calendar of a team means that its captains’ average workload is more ODIs rather than Tests. With that load comes intimate knowledge of a familiar sinking feeling, as described by England’s makeshift captain of the summer, Andrew Strauss: “When your team is under attack, you’ve been forced into a bowling change and it does not work. You have nowhere to go.”The ODI requires different energy levels of a captain, the capacity to think on his feet, and soaking up pressure on behalf of the team and thinking laterally. Along with all these qualities, there lives inside every captain’s head the clear-eyes knowledge that no matter how well things are going, control during a game is capable of changing in an instant. Even the flinty Ricky Ponting admitted that ODIs can actually be “more stress”. The leader of the allegedly pressure-proof Australians says, “The game goes a lot faster. The momentum changes a lot quicker. Sometimes you can’t maintain plans like you want to, you have to act on the spur of the moment, you don’t have the time to think things through.”Kiwi Stephen Fleming, nine years in the job, gets help from his senior players’ group and has tried to keep his captaincy fresh by choosing to captain his county side. To Strauss of England, the short game required being “definite”, deciding to do something and then, “no waiting but doing it straight away”. To captains more than most, this is instant cricket.last_img read more

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IPL 2012 Live: RR vs KKR cricket scores and commentary

first_imgTop class performance from Rajasthan. They were held back after a few quick wickets fell early on in their innings, two being run outs, but the middle order did well to post a reasonable total, which proved to be quite a good one at the end. Kolkata on the other hand never got going, they kept losing wickets regularly and Manoj Tiwary was the only flash in the pan for the visitors at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipur on Sunday. Score | PhotosIPL 2012: RR vs KKR Live: RAJASTHAN ROYALS WIN BY 22 RUNS 7:25 pm | 19.6 overs: WICKET off the last ball and it’s all over for KKR. Johan Botha to Manoj Tiwary, out Bowled!! Manoj Tiwary perishes and that’s the official end of Kolkata for tonight! Manoj Tiwary danced down the track looking to go over the top, misses it completely and the ball finds timber. Rahul Dravid will be a proud man, his team has totally outplayed Kolkata. Manoj Tiwary b Johan Botha 59(49) [4s-7] (KKR 142 all in 20 overs) – RR win by 22 runs.Southpaw Iqbal Abdulla comes into the middle7:18 pm | 18.3 overs: WICKET! Manoj Tiwary did his job but so has Cooper – 2 wickets in a row and the match flips back in RR’s favour. Kevon Cooper to Narine, out Bowled!! Golden duck for Narine. Kevon Cooper bowls another slower one down the leg, Narine backs away looking to flick it across the line, misses it, the ball richochets off the flap of the pad and goes on to hit the stumps. Kevon Cooper is on a hat-trick. Narine b Kevon Cooper 0(1) (KKR 132/9 in 18.3 overs) advertisementSunil Narine, left handed bat, comes to the crease 7:17 pm | 18.2 overs: WICKET! Kevon Cooper to Brett Lee, out Bowled!! Brett Lee was setting up for another biggie, big backlift, the only mistake he did was not to read the slower delivery, swung his bat and the off cutter went on to knock the middle stump back, Kevon Cooper gets another one, he is now the purple cap holder! Brett Lee b Kevon Cooper 25(11) [4s-2 6s-2] (KKR 132/8 in 18.2 overs) 7:15 pm | 18 overs: Okay there’s some late blitz by Manoj Tiwary and he had brought the required run rate under control. That over fetched 19 runs. So KKR are still in contention.The break-up17.5 Amit Singh to Brett Lee, SIX, HUMONGOUS! Bread and butter stuff for Brett Lee who is in such a destructive mood, length ball, clobbered over deep mid wicket, got it right out of the sweet spot, he’s giving the crowd some entertainment here  17.4 Amit Singh to Brett Lee, no run, short ball from Amit Singh, Brett Lee looks to pull and he misses it  17.3 Amit Singh to Brett Lee, SIX, Brett Lee is turning on the heat! 42 needed off 15 now, Brett Lee gets a top edge as he looks to pull one over square leg, big swing of the bat takes the ball over the long leg boundary  17.2 Amit Singh to Brett Lee, FOUR, slapped hard!! Brett Lee backs away and cracks it flat batted through extra cover, he is doing some damage out here, don’t think it would be enough to get his team to win though! Strategic break; KKR need 67 in 4 oversTail-ender Brett Lee comes to the crease 7:00 pm | 14.4 overs: WICKET! Chavan to Shukla, out Caught by Owais Shah!! Shukla bites the dust! He had to go for the big ones, decided to come down and go against the spin, the face of the bat turned up and it went off the toe end, Owais Shah lined himself under it at long off, comfortable catch. Shukla c Owais Shah b Chavan 8(8) [6s-1] (KKR 94/7 in 14.4 overs)  6:52 pm | 12.4 overs: Trivedi to Shukla, no run, what was the keeper trying to do? Shukla opened the face and steered it to Rahane at backward point, he wanted a single but Manoj Tiwary sent him back, a direct hit was needed, Rahane fired in a throw towards the striker’s end but Goswami came running from behind and stopped the ball before it even crossed the stumps. KKR are 77/6 at the stage.Laxmi Shukla, right handed bat, comes to the crease 6:50 pm | 12.2 overs: WICKET! Trivedi to Bhatia, out Caught&Bowled!! Halla bol time for Rajasthan! Trivedi has bowled well today, good slower ball again, Bhatia was looking to play across, too early into the shot, gets a leading edge back to the bowler. Bhatia c and b Trivedi 8(8) [4s-1] (KKR 77/6 in 12.2 overs)Pathan didn’t last long though and so Rajat Bhatia comes into bat at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipuradvertisement6:42 | 10.2 overs: WICKET! Trivedi to Yusuf Pathan, out Caught by Hodge!! Big wicket this! Yusuf Pathan went for the flick a bit too early, gets a top edge and the ball goes up in the air, Hodge at deep square leg covers some ground to settle under it, takes it with fingers pointing up, the crowd have gone crazy! Good change of pace by Trivedi. Yusuf Pathan c Hodge b Trivedi 15(14) [6s-1] (KKR 66/5 in 10.2 overs) 6:38 pm | 10 overs: KKR are 65/4 at the halfway stage. Manoj Tiwary (26*) and Yusuf Pathan (15*) are busy reviving the KKR innings. But it’s going to take them a mammoth effort to do that after the carnage that happened a few minutes ago destroying their top order.KKR’s slogger Yusuf Pathan comes to the crease. Let’s see what he does. 6:16 pm | 5.4 overs: WICKET! Kevon Cooper to Deba Das, out Bowled!! He wasn’t looking like he’s going to last for long, was he? Poor shot to a well disguised off cutter, Deba Das tried to drag it from well outside the off stump, gets a thick inside edge and the ball goes back to hit the middle stump, Kevon Cooper’s honeymoon continues. Deba Das b Kevon Cooper 12(14) [6s-1] (KKR 25/4 in 5.4 overs) 6:15 pm | KKR under lot of pressure. The paceman-spinner combo is working well for RR as first pacer Amit Singh got rid of Kallis and Gambhir in a row and on the first ball of the next over the change off pace saw Brendon McCullum walking off.Debabrata Das, right handed bat, comes to the crease 6:05 pm | 2.1 overs: WICKET! KKR are finished! God have mercy on them! Chavan to Brendon McCullum, out Lbw!! That looked plumb and Brendon McCullum has to walk back. Rajasthan are on a roll here, Brendon McCullum went back and across, looked to whip it through square leg, misses it and is struck plumb on leg and middle, easy decision for the umpire that. Brendon McCullum lbw b Chavan 2(4) (KKR 8/3 in 2.1 overs) Manoj Tiwary, right handed bat, comes to the crease 6:02 pm | 1.6 overs: WICKET! That’s a second for for Amit Singh and he sends Gambhir back. Amit Singh to Gambhir, out Caught by Goswami!! Dear o dear, two in two for Amit Singh and Kolkata are in deep trouble. Amit Singh rolled his fingers across that delivery, superbly bowled, Gambhir wanted to play across the line, he was on his toes as he played at that, gets a faint leading edge, the keeper does the rest. Amit Singh will be on a hat-trick in his next over. Gambhir c Goswami b Amit Singh 0(1) (KKR 8/2 in 1.6 overs) Gautam Gambhir, left handed bat, comes to the crease 6:00 pm | 1.5 overs: WICKET! And Kallis falls cheaply. Bad luck for KKR. Amit Singh to Kallis, out Caught by Dravid!! Soft dismissal that! Poor stuff from Kallis, it was pitched up just outside the off stump, perhaps a tad slower, Kallis drove it on the up, didn’t bother to keep it down, a simple waist high catch for Dravid at mid off, exactly the start Rajasthan would have wanted. Kallis c Dravid b Amit Singh 5(8) (KKR 8/1 in 1.5 overs)  advertisement5:50 pm | 0.1 over: Kallis and Brendon McCullum are at the crease. Kallis is on strike. Chavan will open the attackKOLKATA KINIGHT RIDERS’ INNINGS: Need 165 to winRAJASTHAN ROYALS SCORE 164/5 IN 20 OVERS5:38 pm | 18.6 overs: FREE HIT: Brett Lee to Owais Shah, 2 runs, not too costly, Shah shuffles across and swings it to deep mid wicket, Narine runs across and does the fielding. RR are 156/5 in 19 overs 18.6 Brett Lee to Kevon Cooper, no ball, 1 run, oh dear! A no ball from Lee. Close call but he oversteps slightly, Kevon Cooper slams it to long off and takes a single. Kevon Cooper comes to the crease 5:30 pm | 18.4 overs: WICKET! Menaria departs but not before giving RR the edge. Brett Lee to Menaria, out Bowled!! You miss, I hit. Middle stump is lying flat on the ground. Backs away a bit too much and Lee maintains it dead straight, Menaria tries to reach out but fails to. Lee is pumped up – he punches the air and gives him a send off but Menaria has done his job here. Menaria b Brett Lee 40(30) [4s-4 6s-1] (152/5 in 18.4 overs)Owais Shah, right handed bat, comes to the crease 5:22 pm | 16.1 overs: WICKET! Finally Hodge falls after hitting 44 off just 29 balls. Brett Lee to Hodge, out Caught by Brendon McCullum!! Why would you do this when you’re hitting the ball so well? He tries to do an AB de Villiers, but it’s next to impossible against Lee. Shuffles across and tries to reverse scoop it over the keeper and the ball lobs off something to the keeper. Did it hit the bat though? Not sure. Need to see a replay for that. Hodge c Brendon McCullum b Brett Lee 44(29) [4s-3 6s-2] (RR 125/4 in 16.1 overs)5:10 pm | 14 overs: Looks like Brad Hodge paid attention to what his former captain had to say. And he has blasted Yusuf Pathan for SIX-FOUR and then SIX again. That 14th over fetched 17 runs. And the run rate rockets.Former Royals captain Shane Warne tweets: Watching Royals v KKR in the IPL 1 good over behind that’s all.. No panic, hodge must bat through till at least 18th over.. 160 good score ! RR’s Aussie import Brad Hodge comes to the crease.4:45 pm | 8.4 overs: WICKET! Goswami falls trying to raise the tempo. Bhatia to Goswami, out Bowled!! Tries to be too cute and perishes. Makes room and moves down the leg side before the ball is bowled, Bhatia keeps it simple and bowls it full and straight, Goswami tries to steer it to third man but misses. Goswami was looking in fine touch too, Rajasthan struggling for momentum. Goswami b Bhatia 23(18) [4s-2] (RR 61/3 in 8.4 overs)Ashok Menaria, left handed bat, comes to the crease 4: 35 pm | 6.4 overs: WICKET! And captain Rahul Dravid departs. He too gets run out after scoring 26 off 24 balls. Bhatia to Goswami, out Dravid Run Out!! 1 run completed. Superb fielding! Absolutely brilliant from Iqbal Abdulla. Goswami flicks this to the right of deep mid wicket and the batsmen think they can make it 2, but Abdulla was just too quick, picks the ball cleanly and fires in a flat throw at the bowler’s end where Bhatia catches Rahul Dravid well short. Another run out, and Dravid has to go. He was looking good, that’s a big blow. Dravid run out (Iqbal Abdulla/Bhatia) 26(24) [4s-2 6s-2] (RR 44/2 in 6.4 overs) 4:30 pm | 6 overs: RR are 37 for 1 with captain Rahul Dravid and Shreevats Goswami batting after early setback. They are rotating the strike well and the run rate is gradually climbing for Rajasthan.Shreevats Goswami, left handed bat, comes to the crease 4:12 pm | 1.3 overs: WICKET! Oops! a run out and it’s in-form Rahane who has to take a walk. Not a good start for RR there. Kallis to Dravid, out Rahane Run Out!! Superb fielding by the captain and Rajasthan’s previous match hero goes for a zero. All the dot balls was gradually building the pressure and Dravid wanted a quick run after pushing it to mid off, Rahane was a bit late to react and Gambhir did extremely well to pick it up and hit direct at the striker’s end. Rahane was gone despite the dive. Rahane run out (Gambhir) 0(4) (RR 1/1 in 1.3 overs)4:00 pm | 0.1 overs: Dravid and Rahane are at the crease. Dravid is on strike. Brett Lee will open the attack.  Sunil Narine gets his first IPL game today. West Indies are playing a Test series against Australia back home, but one of their best spinners is in India playing for KolkataTeams Kolkata Knight Riders (Playing XI): Brendon McCullum(w), Jacques Kallis, Gautam Gambhir(c), Manoj Tiwary, Yusuf Pathan, Debabrata Das, Laxmi Shukla, Rajat Bhatia, Brett Lee, Sunil Narine, Iqbal Abdulla Rajasthan Royals (Playing XI): Rahul Dravid(c), Ajinkya Rahane, Ashok Menaria, Brad Hodge, Owais Shah, Kevon Cooper, Ankeet Chavan, Shreevats Goswami(w), Johan Botha, Amit Singh, Siddharth Trivedi Dravid: Important to win first and keep the momentum going. Good to see youngsters like Rahane and Cooper do well. We can’t go too far in the tournament with only a couple of contributors, we need a lot of people to do well. It’s a marathon, not a sprint so we have to be ready. Would’ve bowled well as well but it doesn’t make much of a difference in a T20 game. We’re playing the same eleven. Gambhir: It’s just the start of the tournament, we’ve played only 1 12 over game. We have experience and quality so we should do well. I firmly believe that individuals can only contribute but it’s the team that wins. Love playing in Jaipur, it’s a high scoring venue. We have depth in our batting, hopefully we can restrict them and chase it down. Narine comes in for de Lange.  3:40 pm | TOSS: Kolkata Knight Riders have won the toss and elected to field.last_img read more

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Sachin Tendulkar says no to quitting cricket

first_imgSachin Tendulkar looked dapper in a pin-striped shirt and dark trousers with a haircut which he joked would “make him look younger.”The 39-year-old cricketer, who would soon be a Member of Parliament, was in Pune where he was felicitated on Maharashtra Day for scoring 100 international centuries.Sachin confessed that his nomination to the Rajya Sabha was a “bouncer” but reiterated that “I am not a politician. I am a sportsman and will always remain one.”His nomination to the Upper House has brought him bouquets and brickbats from across the country. If friend Raj Thackeray, chief of the Maharashtra Navnirman Sena, hailed the announcement, Shiv Sena chief Bal Thackeray flayed the nomination as the Congress Party’s “dirty picture”.Yoga guru Baba Ramdev publicly condemned the nomination and even the cricketing community and fans were divided over the batsman’s decision to accept the honour.But Tendulkar stressed that the nomination was not a political move. He pointed out that stalwarts like Lata Mangeshwar and Prithviraj Kapoor were also nominated to the House of Elders for excellence in their chosen fields. “When you get nominated because of your contribution in your field, it’s an honour. I was excited to be nominated,” he said.The master batsman acknowledged that he now has “many responsibilities”, but dismissed speculation that he would retire from cricket to join active politics.”Cricket is my life and it will be so. Whatever I have achieved is due to my contribution to cricket.”Tendulkar also rubbished rumours that he will join politics after retirement, and stressed that he would continue to contribute to sports. “I am a cricketer first and will always remain a sportsman,” he said.advertisementTendulkar’s 100th international ton came on March 16 after more than a year of wait, but he credited his family to help him take the good with the bad. “The formula was just to move ahead. Nobody got carried away with good performances,” he said.For him, the 2011 World Cup win was a more joyous moment than the 100th hundred.He said that he “never looks at the past or the future” but concentrated only on the present. Tendulkar spoke fondly about wife Anjali, and said that she had stood by him “through thick and thin”.last_img read more

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Khargone MP Subhash Patel of BJP

first_imgKhargone MP Subhash Patel. Photo by Chandradeep Kumar.1.    Subhash Patel, Constituency – Khargone (ST Reserved), Party – BJP, margin – 257,879 votes. 2.    He defeated his nearest Congress rival Ramesh Patel, a sitting MLA. 3.    Educational qualification – MA in Sociology, marital status – married, children – two sons4.    Asset declared – Rs 28,019412, criminal cases – none. Patel was keen in politics since school days. He was school president and joint secretary of his college students’ welfare union. He held different posts in the Bharatiya Janta Yuva Morcha (BJYM). Patel was an office-bearer of MP BJP Scheduled Tribe Cell, when he fought Lok Sabha elections.  Patel has a farming business. His spouse is a homemaker, while his parents’ like him are engaged in farming.  No one in his family held some post in BJP. Patel is a self made politician.  General elections were the first big polls, Patel fought. Earlier, he fought Rajpur Nagar Panchayat member elections and won it.The newly elected MP says that he joined politics to work for the uplift of poor, especially tribals.Among his three top priorities, he says he will tirelessly work to see that Indore-Manmad rail road construction takes shape, canals of Asia’s biggest dam Indira Sagar based in Khandwa reach fields and good education to tribal in his constituency. He says the Indore-Manmad rail line will shorten the distance between Indore-Mumbai by 250 km.Patel is expecting that the country will become a super power under the leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, whom he described Vikas Purush.advertisementAbout his win, he says that it was the result of Modi’s wave and MP Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan’s popularity.   He says that the primary responsibility of Parliament was to serve people and chart out policies for the uplift of poorest of the poor. Patel feels that social media has become a very effective tool to reach out the people saying that it helped his party to register landslide win in the general elections.Patel says that he doesn’t opt for books, films, music and sport to unwind. Rather, he says that he derives pleasure in the midst of people.He says Modi and Chouhan are his ideal politicians. He believes that money power and political patronage was not essential for survival in politics. He says that the country was in the safe hands of Modi and it doesn’t face any threat.His solution to1.    Curb inflation – Check on hoarding and black-marketing.2.    Tackle communal violence – Strict action against rioters.3.    Stop terror attacks – Tough action and law against terrorists.4.    Stop corruption – Politicians should set an example for public by leading a clean life. Strict laws.5.    Normalise relations to Pakistan and China – Dialogue.6.    Stabilise rupee – Robust economic policy.7.    Raise employment – Promotion of cottage and small industries.8.    Reduce poverty – Well conceived poverty alleviation plans.last_img read more

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Lalit Modi issues legal notice against Chris Cairns

first_imgThe former Indian Premier League (IPL) head, Lalit Modi on Wednesday has issued legal proceedings against Chris Cairns to win back $4.9 million in damages and costs. Moreover, Modi has moved the High Court in London to keep aside the libel case won by Cairns in 2012 on the grounds of fraud.Modi’s lawyer, Rajesh Vyakarnam in a letter to New Zealand Herald said: “Mr Modi has issued proceedings to set aside the 2012 libel judgment on the ground of fraud and is claiming the return of all damages and costs paid which are in excess of 2.4m.”Mr Modi is still bound by the injunction awarded by Justice Bean and does not wish to prejudice the [Crown Prosecution Service’s] case against Mr Cairns or Mr Fitch-Holland. He will therefore not make any further comments at this time.”However, the former New Zealand cricketer won the libel case and was awarded $183,000 in damages after Modi had accused him of involvement in fixing when playing for the now defunct Indian Cricket League in 2008.But, due to perjury for providing wrong evidences in the libel case, Cairns was arrested this year. Now Cairns finds himself in troubled waters as he has to fight two legal cases.Last month, Cairns appeared at Southwark Crown court along with a barrister friend, who gave evidence in the libel case and hence has been charged for providing misguiding the course of justice.After winning the libel case against Modi, Cairns again came under ICC’s anti-corruption unit scanner along with cricketers Lou Vincent and Daryl Tuffey. But Cairns has completely denied any alleged involvement in match-fixing.advertisementCairns retired from international cricket in 2004 after becoming one of only 12 players in Test history to complete the ‘double’ of 200 wickets and 3,000 runs.last_img read more

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India vs Australia: Rohit-Warner spat heats up Tri-series

first_imgIt took the umpires a fair few minutes to separate the two players on fieldTempers flared once again during the second one-dayer of the ongoing tri-series when Indian opener Rohit Sharma and Australian batsman David Warner got involved in a war of words at the MCG on Sunday.The incident happened in the 23rd over of India’s innings, when Rohit pushed a James Faulkner delivery to mid-off and Warner threw the ball towards the striker’s end but the ball went through Rohit’s legs and wicket-keeper Brad Haddin missed it as India stole a single.Warner and Rohit were then engaged in a verbal spat for a brief time after the opener ran for an overthrow. In the end, it took the umpires a fair few minutes to separate the two of them.The four-match Test series, which preceded the tri-series, was also marred by incidents of altercation between the Indian and Australian players, including Virat Kohli, Warner and Mitchell Johnson.last_img read more

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Microsoft Lumia 640 XL review: A worthy phablet for Windows faithfuls

first_imgIn the last two years the demand for phablets aka the large screen has gone through the roof. People just love these devices, especially in India. Yet, Microsoft, which is trying to push its Windows Phone in a market dominated by Android and Apple’s iOS, hasn’t been particularly active in this segment.So, far it has launched two phablets — the Lumia 1520 and 1320. And that happened in October 2013 at the last Nokia World in Abu Dhabi. Now, it is making a comeback with the Lumia 640 XL. The company knows that the real growth is in the mainstream market and hence positioning the 640 XL as a phablet for budget shopper. The 640 XL is big – 5.7-inches to be precise. But Microsoft has its work cut out as under Rs 20,000 these days it is possible to get a OnePlus One, which basically sports flagship class hardware. The Redmond-based company will have you believe that the combination of its own hardware, services and software stack make for a compelling story. We have been testing the phone for a week or so, read on to find out if it’s worth your money.  Design and build qualityThe Lumia 640 XL is built like any other Lumia smartphone in the market. It is offered in an array of fruity colours and has a body made of thick plastic aka polycarbonate. This lends the phone a very solid feel. It does not feel cheap or gaudily glossy like smartphones from other brands.  That said, it is a massive phone which is not easy to carry around. Microsoft’s industrial designers have created a pleasing design with lots of straight lines, but this also means that from the sides, the phone has sharp edges that will dig into your palms, making it uncomfortable to hold. advertisementOf course, at 9mm and 171 grams, this is a big phone by any metric, so one handed usage is next to impossible. Unless, of course, you have abnormally large hands. The good news is that the overall quality of the product feels first class. You don’t get the feeling that you are using a cheap product as the fit and finish is just fabulous. This is something we have come to expect of Microsoft and it doesn’t disappoint us. There are some minor design blemishes though. For instance, the rear camera has a minor bulge which adds to the thickness of the product and the screen is surrounded by large borders.We also feel that the borders flanking the top and bottom of the display could be smaller, particularly as this phone has software based buttons, not capacitive hardware keys. That could have also reduced the size of the phone.  DisplayThe big 5.7-inch display of the Lumia 640 XL dominates the fascia of the product and also lends it the ‘XL’ nomenclature. Thankfully, Microsoft has decided to offer a 720p HD IPS panel with its ClearBlack polariser. This means that the display has natural looking colours, good viewing angles when the phone is viewed off-axis and decent levels of brightness, especially when viewed under direct sunlight. Yes, the display has a rather low resolution considering the size of the screen, but it appears to be a big improvement from the type of displays Microsoft has shipped in the past on phones like the Lumia 530 and Lumia 535. The pixel density converts to 259 pixels per inch. In the display settings, you can also manually calibrate the display of the Lumia 640 XL to your liking. There are some presets, but we preferred to calibrate it on our own. Out of the box, the display had a warmer/yellowish tinge, which we did not like. In the larger scheme of things, we are glad to report that Microsoft has shipped a good display in the 640 XL, which can handle any task the average smartphone user will throw at the device. This means it is good for watching videos, reading text or even getting work done. In fact, we can say that the extra wide display particularly is helpful while managing Excel sheets or composing large Word documents.  CameraThe one area where Microsoft’s Lumia smartphones have always held an edge over Android smartphones is in the area of imaging. The Lumia 640 XL sure does come with some impressive imaging hardware on the back. It has a 13-megapixel camera with 1/3 inch sensor, a f/2.0 aperture and a focal length of 28mm. It even has optics from Carl Zeiss, something most phones in the price band can’t hope to match. Does all this hardware pay dividends? In one word, yes. advertisementThe Lumia has a great camera on the back. It works well in day time and night time though the images clicked in the evenings do show noise and are grainy. In daylight, the images have ample amount of detail and the colours are true to life. With the new Lumia Denim update, the phone also manages to take photos relatively quickly. Speed is still an issue, but it is not a deal breaker anymore. The camera is equally impressive in low-light scenarios as it can manage to cram in a lot of detail though this detail comes with dollops of noise that make the photos look too grainy. The great bit about Microsoft’s Lumia smartphones is the Lumia camera app. The unique radial user interface allows the user to tweak each and every setting of the shot in a simple and intuitive way. This is very handy if you know your way around a digital camera as you can manipulate the setting to get even better results than the automatic setting. The Lumia 640 XL also excels at shooting videos. It can shoot 1080p videos at 30 frames per seconds. It largely takes shake-free videos with good quality audio. Its camera is also very good at automatically changing the focus as the user pans around while shooting videos.Even on the front, Microsoft has equipped the Lumia 640 XL with a wide angle 5-megapixel sensor, which takes good selfies. More importantly, thanks to the wide-angle lens, you can fit in a lot in the frame while taking selfies.  So if you are gunning for something similar to the famous ‘Oscar Selfie’ with 10 people in it the 640 XL may not be a bad choice. Trust us, it will do a better job than the Samsung Galaxy S5, which was used for the ‘Oscar Selfie’. Check the camera samples here: Image 1, Image 2, Image 3, Image 4, Image 5, Image 6, Image 7, Image 8, Image 9, Image 10. SoftwareSoftware is a weak point of Microsoft’s Lumia phones. Windows Phone, which powers the Lumia 640 XL just can’t match Android and iOS in terms of quality and quantity when it comes to apps. Yes, it can be argued that Microsoft has enough apps in its store to fulfil the needs of most people, but their quality is a different story altogether. Even if one takes a look at the Facebook and Twitter apps, then it is easy to realise the gulf in the quality and user experience offered by a Windows Phone app and an Android or iOS app. That said, at its heart Windows Phone remains a competent operating system. As always there are things that it does better than Android and there are things that Android does better than it. Largely, of all the operating systems in the market, Windows Phone is the simplest of the lot. With Windows Phone 8.1, it even gets an Android style notification shade. Its Start Screen is dynamic and is always bustling with information. There’s no denying if you just work with basic apps, Windows Phone offers an enjoyable experience. advertisementHowever, it still does not play well with Google’s popular services and neither has a virtual assistant that works in India. Hence, it is likely to be inferior for anyone coming from Android or iOS. That said, Microsoft’s services are well integrated in the OS – so you get things like Skype, Office, Nokia Here maps with offline navigation and also a bunch of other third party apps. Microsoft, in fact, has preloaded a lot of stuff on the Lumia 640 XL. Out of the box, the phone comes preloaded with Food Panda, Book My Show, BBM, Gameloft, FitBit, Make my Trip, OLA Cabs, We Chat and Zomato. Most of these apps are essentials, so we are not classifying them as bloatware, however on a phone with just 8GB of onboard storage this was a little excessive. The good bit is that unlike Android, Microsoft allows the user to remove all preloaded apps. Nothing is forced upon the user. Users can also install apps on an SD card unlike Android. It is also worth keeping in mind that the phone will be upgradable to Windows 10 for the phone later in the year. This will add a host of new features to the phone including support for universal apps that will work across different types of devices. To its detriment, currently, its software is also not well customised for the large screen the phone offers. So there is no windowed multitasking paradigm and even the keyboard is not dynamic, offering a one-handed mode. Some of these features, however, are expected in the Windows 10 update.  Performance By modern standards, the Microsoft Lumia 640 XL is running on frugal hardware. It runs on an ageing Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor, which hums along at 1.2GHz with four cores. It is coupled with 1GB RAM and 8GB of internal memory. There’s also a microSD card slot with support for up to 128 GB of expansion. The meagre hardware belies the performance offered by the Lumia 640 XL. It feels much faster than a phone running an ageing processor. Of course, Microsoft’s code base for Windows Phone is different, and probably more optimised, than Android, which enables a smoother and faster experience on similar hardware. But just to be clear, we are no labelling the performance as earth shattering. The second-generation Moto G runs on similar hardware and we can say that the performance on it is close to what a user can get with the Lumia 640 XL. The phone can multitask well and at times we had more than 10 apps opened at the same time. The phone showed no signs of lags. In the longer run, however, performance could be an issue. Windows 10 will be a big update and it will be interesting to see how the phone performs. In terms of gaming, the quality of the graphics is not great. Using the Adreno 305 GPU, the phone offers average gaming experience. While there were no major frame rate issues, the quality of the graphics was certainly not what you’d expect of a phone costing so much. Network performance of the phone was fine and we did not face many dropped calls while testing the phone. We tested the device on a Vodafone network in Delhi NCR. It is also a dual-SIM phone with dual active functionality, which makes it more enticing. There’s no 4G LTE support, Microsoft will launch a separate 4G model of the same in India.  BatteryThe thing that impressed us the most about the Lumia 640 XL is the battery life. The 3,000mAh battery in combination with the rather frugal Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 CPU converts to amazing battery life. On an average, the phone lasts in-excess of 28-30 hours. The phone never died within the 24 hour period and on one occasion we managed to use the phone two days at a stretch. Admittedly, during this 2 day stretch we did not use the Facebook app, which is a major source of notifications and often keeps a user glued to the screen. On average, our tests included 2 hours of phone calls, 2 email accounts, 2 social networks, 15-20 photos shot with the phone’s camera, 45 minutes of music streaming, 30 minutes of web browsing, and around 30 minutes of streaming videos on YouTube. We also played games like Asphalt 8 for long stretches.  Should you buy it?There are two ways to look at the Lumia 640 XL. It is a well-designed but somewhat underpowered phone. Or you can see it as a device punches above its weight despite its more humble hardware. The performance of the Lumia 640 XL is mostly adequate but we still feel hesitant in recommending a device with the Snapdragon 400 and 8GB internal storage at this price. That said, the performance of the 640 XL rear camera and battery is superb. In these two areas, no Android phone in the price bracket comes close. Then there is the Windows Phone operating system, which continues to hold back the phone. The apps on the OS aren’t as good as Android or iOS and many services that are loved by users are not available. If you can live without the core Google experiences like good Gmail or Chrome experience, then the Lumia 640 XL will pleasantly surprise you. If not, then you should give it a skip. In nutshell, the Lumia 640 XL is a solid budget phablet if you care for camera, battery and basic smartphone functionality. But this is not an Android phone and doesn’t match the rich experience that a similarly-priced Lollipop or KitKat-powered phone can provide.last_img read more

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Richie Benaud: Australia offers state funeral for cricket legend

first_imgFormer Australian cricketer and legendary commentator Richie Benaud died late on ThursdayThe Australian government on Friday offered a state funeral to the family of former Australian captain and legendary cricket commentator Richie Benaud, who died aged 84.Australia’s prime minister Tony Abbott said there would hardly be an Australian over the past 40 years who hadn’t listened to Benaud on radio or television. Benaud died on Thursday night.”He certainly will be very, very much missed,” Abbott was quoted as saying by the BBC on Friday.”He was a very, very effective cricketer, a great captain, a great character and great personality.”Benaud was born in Penrith, outside Sydney. All flags on New South Wales government buildings and establishments including the Sydney Harbour Bridge were lowered to half-mast on Friday.Benaud’s former employer, the Nine TV network, said his popularity extended well beyond the cricket community.”Richie Benaud’s passing has robbed us not only of a national treasure, but a lovely man,” David Gyngell, channel Nine chief executive, said.”Richie earned the profound and lasting respect of everyone across the world of cricket and beyond, first as an outstanding player and captain, then as an incomparable commentator, and through it all as a wonderful human being,” Gyngell said.last_img read more

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IPL 8: Mumbai crush Hyderabad to seal playoff berth, second spot

first_imgMumbai Indians crushed Sunrisers Hyderabad by nine wickets in a must-win final league game to sail into play-offs of the Indian Premier League cricket tournament on Sunday.ScorecardAsked to bowl, Mumbai first came up with an impressive effort to bowl out Sunrisers for just 113 and then chased down the target with consummate ease with nine wickets in hand and 37 balls to spare.By virtue of this win, Mumbai jumped to the second spot in the standings with 16 points from 14 games and will now face table toppers Chennai Super Kings in the Qualifier 1 at Mumbai on Tuesday.Third-placed Royal Challengers Bangalore will meet Rajasthan Royals in the eliminator at Pune on Wednesday.Chasing the modest paltry target, Mumbai finished at 114 for the loss of just one wicket in 13.5 overs.With no pressure on the back, both Parthiv and Simmons played freely. While Parthiv smashed an unbeaten 51 off 37 balls with the help of nine boundaries, Simmons was unlucky as he was dismissed just two short of his fifty.Simmons made 48 off 44 balls and decorated his innings with four boundaries and two sixes before being caught by Shikhar Dhawan off Karn Sharma’s (1/38) bowling with Mumbai just needing eight runs for the win.Skipper Rohit Sharma finished off the proceedings without any further damage, remaining unbeaten on 7.But the credit for the victory should go to Mumbai’s bowling attack which dished out a clinical display to bundle out Sunrisers Hyderabad for a modest 113.Left-arm pacer Mitchell McClenaghan (3/16) led Mumbai’s bowling attack from the front and he was assisted well by left-arm spinner Jagadeesha Suchith (2/14) and Lasith Malinga (2/17).advertisementElecting to bat, Sunrisers were put on the backfoot straightway by Mumbai as the hosts lost both their openers — Dhawan (1) and skipper David Warner (6) — early in consecutive balls.While Dhawan’s off stump was rattled by Malinga’s slinging yorker in the last delivery of the first over, Warner top-edged a McClenaghan’s well-directed short ball to Kieron Pollard as Sunrisers slumped to seven for two in 1.1 overs.Then Henriques and K L Rahul (25 off 24) joined hands and somewhat steadied Sunrisers’ sinking ship with a fighting 28-run fourth wicket stand before Mumbai picked up three quick wickets to tighten the noose around the home team.Suchith struck twice in the 10th over before veteran Harbhajan Singh (1/18) also registered his name in the wicket-takers list an over later.Suchith dismissed Henriques and Naman Ojha in consecutive deliveries to stand on the verge of a hat-trick, which eventually did not materialise.Suchith first foxed Henriques with a tossed up delivery and wicketkeeper Parthiv Patel made no mistake in whipping the bails off before new man Ojha chipped the next ball straight to Rohit.After that, the onus was all on Rahul to take Sunrisers to a fighting total but he too perished soon, playing on a Harbhajan delivery on to his off stumps.Sunrisers’ innings never got the momentum as they lost wickets at regular intervals.Karn (15) and A Ashish Reddy (17) hung in there for a couple of overs before departing. In between Bhuvneshwar Kumar too failed with the bat becoming McClenaghan’s third victim of the day.Towards the end Dale Steyn (19 off 11) played a good hand to take Sunrisers close to the 120-run mark.Teams(from):Mumbai Indians: Lendl Simmons, Parthiv Patel(wk), Rohit Sharma(c), Ambati Rayudu, Hardik Pandya, Kieron Pollard, Harbhajan Singh, Jagadeesha Suchith, Mitchell McClenaghan, Vinay Kumar, Lasith Malinga, Colin Munro, Aditya Tare, Jasprit Bumrah, Marchant de Lange, Pawan Suyal, Shreyas Gopal, Pragyan Ojha, Abhimanyu Mithun, Aiden Blizzard, Akshay Wakhare, Nitish Rana, Siddhesh Lad, Unmukt Chand, Ben Hilfenhaus, Alex HalesSunrisers Hyderabad: David Warner(c), Shikhar Dhawan, Moises Henriques, Naman Ojha(wk), Eoin Morgan, Lokesh Rahul, Karn Sharma, Bipul Sharma, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Dale Steyn, Praveen Kumar, Ishant Sharma, Parvez Rasool, Ashish Reddy, Ricky Bhui, Chama Milind, Ravi Bopara, Hanuma Vihari, Prasanth Padmanabhan, Siddarth Kaullast_img read more

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