Conficker Worm Prepares For A New Release On April 1

first_img Explore further The conficker worm is periodically evolving by downloading updates that creates thousands of false domains daily to throw off security investigators. On the day it chooses to update, it selects 500 correct domains out of the 50,000 candidates to download malware and updates from.• On the first release it tried to download and execute a file called loadav.exe. It turned out that the file was never uploaded and the next generation did away with this. This led investigators to believe it was a malware program trying to promote itself as fake antivirus software. • The second release, the worm used Windows Services, on unpatched machines, to spread. This new release also had the power to spread over network shares by trying to log in autonomously into network machines with weak passwords. It developed the ability to infect USB sticks connected to infected machines, giving it another means of transmission. • On the final and third release, which became know as the Downadup virus, peer-to-peer communication between infected systems was added to it’s arsenal of weapons. The virus also added new domain-generation algorithms to help it disguise where it was receiving its updates from.Microsoft is offering a bounty for the worm’s writers and security experts are no closer to having any clue as to the individual or individuals who are writing the Conficker code. As Conficker continues to spread and get smarter, there is little doubt it’s creating an army of infected machines, one that can cause serious damage. On April 1 we will see the attacks be taken to the next level. One can only guess what this next release has in store for the Global Internet Community.© 2009 PhysOrg.com Citation: Conficker Worm Prepares For A New Release On April 1 (2009, March 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-conficker-worm-april.html The Raging Windows Worm has attacked over 8.9 Million Computerscenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — The conficker worm created havoc last year when it infected over 10 million computers on a global scale. The unique design of the conficker worm allowed for this large scale attack to over 8 million business computers and scores of individual computers in 2008. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Untouched meteorite impact crater found via Google Earth

first_img More information: The Kamil Crater in Egypt, Science Express, Published Online July 22, 2010. doi:10.1126/science.1190990 Citation: Untouched meteorite impact crater found via Google Earth (2010, July 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-untouched-meteorite-impact-crater-google.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Meteorite hits on Earth: There may be a recount Digital elevation model of the Kamil Crater with superimposed magnetic anomaly map detected after systematic searches and collection of meteorites >10 g. Image credit: Luigi Folco, Science Express, doi:10.1126/science.1190990. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Folco said the crater is so well-preserved it will provide a lot of information on small-scale meteorite impacts. There are only 176 confirmed impact craters on the Earth’s surface, but most wear away quickly, and only 15 of them are smaller than 300 meters in diameter. The new crater will help scientists to assess the hazards posed by small meteorites. Such impacts occur about once every 10-100 years, and most small meteorites burn up as they enter the atmosphere and do not reach the ground.The team also analyzed samples of soil and glass formed by fusion of sand at the site. They hope these analyses will help them pinpoint the age of the crater, and preliminary results suggest the meteorite probably hit no earlier than 5,000 years ago, which is recent on the geological time scale.The coordinates of Kamil Crater are 22º 01′ 06″ N 26º 05′ 15″ E. (PhysOrg.com) — A pristine meteorite impact crater has been found in a remote area of the Sahara desert in southwest Egypt. The crater was originally noticed on Google Earth images, and is believed to be only a few thousand years old. The 45-meter-wide and 16-meter-deep crater, called Kamil, was probably formed by the impact of an iron meteorite, and was first noticed on Google Earth images in 2008 by Vincenzo de Michele, former curator of the Civico Museo di Storia Naturale, in Milan, Italy. Now researchers led by Luigi Folco, meteorite curator at the Museo Nazionale dell’Antartide attached to the University of Siena, have also reported finding the crater in satellite images taken in 1972, and have visited the site. The report is online in the latest edition of the Science journal.The rim of the crater is three meters high and is surrounded by spokes or rays of light-colored material blasted out of the crater by the impact. Folco said “rayed craters” are extremely rare on Earth but common on Mars or the moon, where the sparse atmosphere provides fewer environmental processes to erode them. On Earth such rays or spokes are usually eroded or covered quickly.The scientists traveled to the site last year to confirm the discovery, and returned in February this year. During their expeditions they have located over 5,000 pieces of iron meteorite, weighing 1.7 tonnes in total, and they estimate the original meteorite was around 1.3 meters wide, weighed 5-10 tonnes, and hit the Earth at about 3.5 kilometers per second, causing most of its material to vaporize. Kamil Crater. Image credit: Luigi Folco.last_img read more

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Intels multimillion baby Omek is acquired for motion sensing

first_img Explore further Outside of Intel, company watchers think that the deal may be linked to a set-top box that Intel plans to deliver. In April this year, stories circled around Intel’s plans to deliver the box. A company spokesperson had said Intel’s set-top box would have a camera with recognition technology, but that it would be used for identifying users and bringing up preset configurations on the box. The TV box could then maintain profiles of the programming each of them prefers. (Phys.org) —What would Intel do with a company focused on motion sensing technology? A number of ideas circle around the announcement this week that Intel has bought Israel-based Omek Interactive. An Intel spokesperson in Israel said the deal would raise Intel’s capabilities in immersive “perceptual computing” experiences. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Intel’s Perceptual Computing marks neo-desktop era Perceptual computing refers to a changing of the guard—the core functional tools of keyboard and mouse—in human and computer interactions. Intel would like to be in step as many technology innovators look for other ways to interface with computers. Perceptual computing deals with sensory technologies that involve human gestures and voice. Intel Capital, in fact, had provided Omek, headquartered in Bet Shemesh with an office in Taiwan, with financing in 2011.Now Omek is under its wing. Some outside watchers suggest there may be a time when any desktop, laptop, tablet, or smartphone that ships with an Intel processor will have gesture-sensing built in. Visitors at the CES 2013 show had the opportunity to learn more about Omek’s software, involving gesture recognition and body tracking. Janine Kutliroff, CEO, and Eli Elhadad, vice president of game development, demonstrated Omek’s technology. Instead of being bound by machine language, said Kutliroff, the company wanted to take away those boundaries with interactions using gesture commands, not screen touch. The products are designed for use in TVs, game consoles, computers, interactive signs and medical devices. Omek uses a sensor to determine a person’s movements and then integrates that data into a target program. The Omek products work with 3-D cameras and support a range of processors and operating systems. Omek is a software company with the motto, “Control everything without touching anything.” Its products include both close-range and long-range body tracking. The long range solution, Beckon, is a set of middleware and tools, using full body tracking to determine a user’s movement. Grasp is a development suite that works at close range with PCs, working with smaller, more detailed movements. Grasp processes input from a type of depth camera, optimized for close-range operation. These close-range cameras are developed into modules. They can be incorporated directly inside the chassis of PCs and tablet devices.Grasp takes the depth map from these cameras and segments the user’s hands from the rest of the scene. Grasp then constructs a skeleton made of 22 joints for each hand and tracks the position of the joints on a frame to frame basis. © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Intel’s multimillion baby Omek is acquired for motion sensing (2013, July 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-intel-multimillion-baby-omek-motion.html More information: www.tampabay.com/news/science/ … ry-tv-gadget/2114858 www.computerworld.com/s/articl … r_new_cable_providerlast_img read more

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Cane toads demonstrating impressive adaptive abilities in Western Australia

first_img Explore further Cane toad pioneers speed up invasions Citation: Cane toads demonstrating impressive adaptive abilities in Western Australia (2014, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-cane-toads-abilities-western-australia.html One study, for example, carried out by researchers from several universities in Australia, has found that the toads have developed a diurnal pattern of rehydration to prevent dehydration during high temperature days. They’ve published their findings in the journal Biology Letters.In their study, the researchers wondered how it was possible that the toads were surviving in parts of Australia that should be too hot for them. Toads keep cool by expiring water (which they normally replenish at nigh), but the excessive temperatures in western parts of Australia would dehydrate and kill the toads, or so it would seem, before they could rehydrate.To find out what was going on, the researchers attached acoustic tags to several specimens and installed an underwater listening station in a section of lake formed by a dam that the toads were known to use as a watering place. Analysis of the data showed that the toads had changed their normal hydration patterns—they were climbing out of their shelters and drinking twice a day—once at night and once in broad daylight—instead of the normal once a night. This, the researchers note is a rare example of extreme plasticity in a behavioral trait of an animal—one that allows them to survive in an extremely hostile environment.On another front, amateur researchers who have formed a group (Kimberley Toad Busters) with the aim of curbing the spread of the toads have found that the amphibians widen their territory by taking advantage of floods. Several examples of toads riding flood debris downstream have been observed (and photographed) offering an explanation of how the toads are able to make their way into areas that have been protected by screening devices—yet another example of the toads’ impressive survival skills. Journal information: Biology Letters © 2014 Phys.org More information: Biol. Lett. February 2014 vol. 10 no. 2 20131014 DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2013.1014 Cane toads have over the past 85 years become a problem in Australia. Originally native to South America, some of the toads were captured and turned loose in the 1930’s in Australian sugar cane fields with the hope of helping to reduce cane beetles. Since that time, they have reproduced to the point of becoming a nuisance (and in some cases endangering the survival of other species) and have spread to other parts of the country, most recently, into the west. As the problem has grown, scientists have looked to curb toad populations and in so doing have recently learned of some of the impressive ways the toads have adapted for survival in their adopted homeland. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Amyloid fibrils lit with nearinfrared radiation found to emit a dim nearinfrared

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: Jonathan Pansieri et al. Ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared optical properties of amyloid fibrils shed light on amyloidogenesis, Nature Photonics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41566-019-0422-6 A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has found that amyloid fibrils lit with near-infrared radiation emit a dim, near-infrared signal. In their paper published in the journal Nature Photonics, the group describes their study of amyloid fibrils and plaques in mice and humans and what they found. Play Sequential 3D modelling using ex vivo confocal microscopy images of isolated amyloid plaque in brain tissue from a patient with Alzheimer’s disease within the hippocampus area. Credit: Nature Photonics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41566-019-0422-6 Citation: Amyloid fibrils lit with near-infrared radiation found to emit a dim, near-infrared signal (2019, May 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-amyloid-fibrils-lit-near-infrared-emit.html Researchers discover insights into amyloids associated with Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes Explore further Amyloid fibrils are tiny structures that self-form in some proteins. When they clump together, they form what are known as amyloid plaques. They are associated with the development of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Despite years of study, it is still not known what causes them. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn more about the early stages of fibril development by developing a way to see it happening.Prior work had shown that when ultraviolet light shines onto tissue-containing proteins, the tissue emits blue light. Researchers have found that the emissions become stronger if there are fibrils present in the proteins. While this finding has been useful, it has only allowed for superficial study of fibril formation due to the shallow depth of UV and blue light penetration. In their experiments, the researchers tried firing near-field radiation at sample human proteins and found that and fibrils present would emit a dim, near-infrared signal. This was important, because unlike UV light, near-field radiation can penetrate relatively deeply into tissue.Next, the researchers genetically developed an Alzheimer’s mouse model, opened their skulls and fired near-field radiation at living brain tissue, observing a near-infrared signal. They suggest that in the future, it might be possible to use their technique to test for Alzheimer’s disease in humans—currently the only way to do so is by using cognitive tests. How such a test might work, though, is not clear. With present technology, such a test would involve opening the skull and inserting a probe—an option most patients would not choose. The researchers acknowledge such roadblocks, but suggest that in the future, new technology could allow such a test without surgery. They report that the unique properties of amyloid fibrils could lead to new biophotonic devices. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Nature Photonics © 2019 Science X Network Play Video made with 60 ex vivo confocal microscopy images of isolated amyloid plaque in brain tissue from a patient with Alzheimer’s disease within the hippocampus area. Credit: Nature Photonics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41566-019-0422-6 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenlast_img read more

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Opinion Its Your Right To See Your Medi

first_imgOpinion: It’s Your Right To See Your Medical Records…. Sean Justice by NPR News Harlan Krumholz 8.28.19 8:16am At a time when many insurers and health information technology companies are busily assembling databases of hundreds of millions of medical records, Americans find it difficult to get access to their own.If you try to get yours, be prepared for confusing policies, ill-informed staff, wasted time and high costs. Even then, you may not get the records you seek. And all of this is at odds with your federal rights.Last week a relative of mine relayed a typical story. She requested her medical records in digital format, a right endorsed in federal statutes. Now, two months later, she is still struggling to get them. The hospital had contracted with a third party, and evidently this company transacts only through snail mail.My colleagues and I have previously investigated records access. In a study published last fall, we surveyed 83 top American hospitals and found discrepancies were common between the policies hospitals described on patient authorization forms and what employees later said to patients on the phone. On the forms, hospitals often did not provide an option to receive the entire medical record in digital format. On calls, employees said they would release the whole record. But most hospitals were out of compliance with federal regulations by refusing to provide the documents in the format requested by patients. Many hospitals made it expensive to get records. Despite federal guidance that records delivered digitally should not cost more than $6.50, hospitals charged as much as $541.50 for a 200-page record, often without mentioning other options.In another study, published in June, we showed how hard it is to get your radiology images. Almost every institution could provide them only on CDs, an antiquated technology. The cost could be as much as $75. If you wanted images from departments outside radiology, then you would need to make a separate request for each one. In a preprint recently published on medRxiv, an online platform that shares research before it has been peer reviewed, researchers reported the results of a study of people’s access to their medical records. The authors include Deven McGraw, former deputy director for health information privacy at the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights, who is now chief regulatory officer at Ciitizen. McGraw and her colleagues found that the majority of the more than 3,000 health care providers they surveyed were violating rights concerning access to health care data. The most common failure was the “refusal to send records to [a] patient or a [patient’s] designee by e-mail.” Many health care institutions were also likely out of compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s limitations on fees.Together, these studies show that many health systems around the U.S. fail to comply with the law by routinely violating people’s right to access their digital health information. So what can you do to improve your chances?First, know your rights. You have the right “to inspect, review, and receive a copy of your health and billing records that are held by health plans and health care providers,” according to the website of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. You have the right to “correct your health record by adding information to it to make it more accurate or complete.” A guide from the Office of the National Coordinator can help you with the details. By the way, these rights also apply to records created by pharmacies, laboratories and insurers.Second, be persistent. The studies indicate that health care providers are often ill informed about the law. To be successful, you may need to push. I know someone who was about to be charged $450 for medical records, and by knowing her rights she bargained the charge down to a reasonable amount, though still out of compliance with the law. If you want your records, then sometimes you will need to keep at it. You may even need to push the issue high up in the organization.Third, support change. What we need, for starters, is for the government to enforce the current law. The law is explicit regarding your right to access your health information. Your rights under federal law need to be respected. When your rights are violated, you can contact the Office for Civil Rights or your congressional representatives for help. What you do may help the next person.There are reasons for optimism. For instance, there is work on tools to help people obtain their data more easily. (Disclosure: I founded a startup that developed a tool called Hugo, a platform to help people get their data digitally.) Groups such as OpenNotes are setting an example by encouraging access to all our health care data and encouraging patients to read their health care provider’s notes and records as a way to improve their care.With the Trump administration’s interest in interoperability of medical records, I hope that we are on the cusp of a historical moment when people will finally get full access to their digital data, as specified under the law. When patients have easy access to their data, they will have the chance to use that data for their own benefit and the benefit of others. This could be a transformational shift giving patients more power to shop for their care, to understand their care and to become true partners in research.Harlan Krumholz is a cardiologist and the Harold H. Hines Jr. professor of medicine at Yale School of Medicine. He directs the Yale New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation. He is the founder of Hugo, a personal health information platform.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more

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Food Supplies dept looks to ensure adequate paddy procurement in districts

first_imgKolkata: The state Food and Supplies department is taking all necessary steps to ensure adequate procurement of paddy in West Midnapore, Jhargram, Bankura and Purulia.Jyotipriya Mallick, the state Food and Supplies minister, will be visiting the districts in the end of June. Senior officials of the department will also be visiting the places along with the minister.They will be visiting the places to oversee the procurement of paddy. This comes at a time when a target of procuring 35 lakh MT paddy has been set in the boro season. So far, the procurement of 29.5 lakh MT has become possible. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe process of procuring the remaining quantity of paddy is going on in full swing to reach the target.Mallick held a high level meeting in Khadya Bhavan on Tuesday. The state Agriculture minister Asish Banerjee, Pradip Mazumder, advisor to the Chief Minister on agriculture, senior officials of the Food and Supplies department, district controllers and representatives of both Bengal Rice Millers’ Association and District Rice Millers’ Association, were also present in the meeting. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedAfter the meeting, Mallick said: “I, along with officials of my department, will be visiting the districts in the end of June to oversee the procurement of paddy.”During the minister’s visit to the district, he will hold meeting with administrative officers, distributors and dealers there.He further said that rice cannot be stocked for than two months in any district. So, directions have been given in Tuesday’s meeting, to disburse the excess quantity of rice after maintaining a stock of two to three months. There are districts including West Midnapore, Purulia, Bankura and Jhargram, where paddy will be sent from Burdwan and Birbhum. It will help in ensuring adequate stock of rice in all districts.Mallick said: “Our target is to support farmers and to ensure that they get the right price so that they do not have to go for distress sell.”With steps taken by the Mamata Banerjee government, there was hardly any case of distress sell in the past seven years, since her government came to power.last_img read more

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EU scraps summit Greece on razors edge

first_imgThe EU cancelled a full 28-nation summit on Sunday to decide whether Greece stays in the European single currency as a divided euro-zone struggled to reach a reform-for-bailout deal.The summit had been billed as a last chance to stop Greece crashing out, but was scrapped as eurozone finance ministers returned today to marathon talks after failing overnight to overcome distrust with Greece’s leftist government.With Greece facing growing misery from capital controls and fears its banks could collapse within days, a meeting of the leaders of the 19 countries that use the euro was still due to go ahead in Brussels on Sunday. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJI“I have cancelled EUCO (the European Union summit) today,” European Council President Donald Tusk tweeted. “Eurosummit to start at 1600 (1400 GMT) and last until we conclude talks on Greece.” The talks on Saturday ended amid deep divisions about whether to trust Greece’s radical Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras with a third bailout worth more than 80 billion euros ($ 89 billion), following months of wrangling.Fiscal hawks Germany floated a plan for a temporary “Grexit” from the euro while Finland reportedly decided flat out not to accept a new Greek rescue programme, causing panic. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindTheir downbeat assessment came despite Greece’s international creditors calling Athen’s new proposals a positive step forward after months of wrangling on a follow-up to two previous bailouts in 2010 and 2012 worth 240 billion euros.The proposals — including pension cuts and tax hikes that had been largely rejected by Greeks in a referendum a week ago — were approved by the Greek parliament in the early hours of Saturday.In Greece, there is growing alarm at capital controls that have closed banks and rationed cash at ATMs for nearly two weeks, leading to fears that food and medicine will soon run short. Economy Minister Giorgos Stathakis warned the restrictions will likely stay in place for “months” even if there is a deal.Greek newspapers expressed alarm, with the headline of the Eleftheros Typos in Athens saying: “The future of Greece on a razor’s edge” and asking “what will happen in the case of the nightmare of a Grexit?” The European Central Bank is providing emergency liquidity to keep Greek banks afloat but has frozen the limit, with fears that failure to reach a deal could cause it to shut off the taps completely.But a lack of trust in Greek authorities was blocking any agreement by the eurozone ministers, who repeatedly called for further steps from Athens to show commitment to reforms.Italian Economy Minister Pier Carlo Padoan urged the Greek government to take steps as early as Monday to prove it would stick to its word.last_img read more

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Salman warns about fake FB ac

first_imgSalman Khan has warned his fans about a fake Facebook account operating in his name, which claims that the superstar is casting for his new project.The 49-year-old actor took to twitter to dismiss the false social media account.‘A fake Facebook page claims that I am casting for a film. Beware of fakes and rumors. “Neither me nor my managers are casting for any project,’ Salman posted.The Bajrangi Bhaijaan star is also miffed with people who click pictures with him and later end up misusing them.‘Some people click pics with me and then misuse them. “This is not okay,’ he wrote. Salman is gearing up for his return as the host of the ninth season of reality show Bigg Boss, which will air from October 11.last_img read more

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Exhibition to bring traditional Indian art into limelight

first_imgBringing twenty-one weavers and craftsmen from different regions of India under one roof, Delhi Crafts Council (DCC) is organizing a three-day Sarees Exhibition in the city. The exhibition is an initiative by DCC to bring the traditional Indian art of weaving and dyeing of sarees in public limelight.The exhibition, to be organized at Aga Khan Hall, would showcase an exclusive collection of Naturally Dyed Sarees. Named ‘Sarees of India: Innovating Tradition’, the exhibition will highlight innovative new techniques and designs that infuse new life into traditional techniques, prints and weaves. It will be held from October 5 – 7, as part of the celebration for their golden jubilee year. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe exhibition also aims to provide a platform to regional weavers to display their craft on a contemporary platform. Chief Guest for the event would be Sally Holkar from Women’s Weaves Organization, who has worked tirelessly in Madhya Pradesh to preserve the dying weaves of the state. “This year, DCC will be presenting collections of twenty-one participants working with different Indian weaves and printing techniques. India has a rich diversity of such techniques and it is our endeavor to bring these exciting developments before the discerning audience of Delhi,” says Kamayani Jalan, Member-In-Charge of Sarees of India and Vice President DCC. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveDuring the exhibition, an annual award called the “Sutrakar Samman”‘ will be given to a selected weaver with outstanding capabilities. Through this award, DCC seeks to celebrate India’s rich textile heritage and honor excellence in traditional weaving skills while encouraging a commitment towards the continuity of the craft. This year, the Samman will be presented to Abdullah, a weaver from Mubarakpur, Uttar Pradesh. Learning the traditional weaving skills from his father and holding expertise in “kadwa” brocade borders, Abdullah is a member of the Mubarakpur Weaves team. DCC will also honour an accomplished dyer, Ram Kishore Chippa from Jaipur, who has been working with natural dyes for 43 years. He has worked with the National Craft Institute for hand printed textiles in the past. Ram Kishore’s skills are well recognized and he is called in as a master trainer for natural dyeing workshops across the country. Exhibitors from various parts of the country would take part in the exhibition. The list includes well known exhibitors from Udaipur, Hyderabad, Bujh, West Bengal, Kutch, Odisha, Bangalore, Uttar Pradesh, Assam, Mumbai, Bihar and Andhra Pradesh. Some significant saree styles to look out for are Ikat, Ajrakh, Bappaditya, Bandhani, Bomkai, Sambhalpuri, Kasuti, Maheshwari, Shibori, Dabu, Tussars, Venkatgiri, Jamdani, Tasar, Banaras and Linen.last_img read more

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